Mrs Bertin's Jewelry Box

Celebrating finery and frippery

9,276 notes

kurvendiskussionen:

thelingerieaddict:

The Corset’s Effect

Photo Credits: 

1. corset, 1750-75, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | Portrait of Grand Duchess Maria Fiodorovna by Alexander Roslin, 1777

2. corset, 1839-41, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | Marquise de Béthisy as Orientalin, 1833

3. corset, 1810-50, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | Portrait of Charlotte and Elizabeth Sullivan, daughters of Sir Richard Sullivanby Reinagle Ramsay Richard, 1810

4. corset, 1909, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | photograph, c. 1910-13

5. corset, by Maison Léoty, 1891, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | A Bar at the Folies-Bergere by Edouard Manet, 1882

6. corset, c. 1876, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | On the Thames by James Tissot, c. 1874

7. corset, by Worcester Corset Company, c. 1898, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | Mrs. Ralph Curtis by John Singer Sargent, 1898

Please don’t remove the credits. 

(via ourlavenderlady)

299 notes

philamuseum:

Fashion Friday: Celebrating LanvinHappy 125th anniversary to Lanvin. One of the first fashion houses in Paris, Lanvin remains highly regarded for its superbly crafted and richly ornamented garments. Wedding gowns were a specialty of the house’s founder, Jeanne Lanvin. This 1925 wedding gown was inspired by early fifteenth-century Italian fashions, including bridal headdresses found in the fifteenth-century artist Pisanello’s studies of Northern Italian women. Explore more of our Lanvin holdings here.Wedding Ensemble: Dress, Slip, and Headpiece, 1925, by Jeanne Lanvin

philamuseum:

Fashion Friday: Celebrating Lanvin

Happy 125th anniversary to Lanvin. One of the first fashion houses in Paris, Lanvin remains highly regarded for its superbly crafted and richly ornamented garments. Wedding gowns were a specialty of the house’s founder, Jeanne Lanvin. This 1925 wedding gown was inspired by early fifteenth-century Italian fashions, including bridal headdresses found in the fifteenth-century artist Pisanello’s studies of Northern Italian women. Explore more of our Lanvin holdings here.

Wedding Ensemble: Dress, Slip, and Headpiece, 1925, by Jeanne Lanvin

(via mimic-of-modes)

14,900 notes

thecrescentgrove:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.

Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.

"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."

(Article)

Oh my gods this makes me so happy.

(via nitrateglow)